What Does Canada “150th Celebrations” Mean to Me

 

I immigrated to Canada in 1991 at the age of 21. I became Canadian few years after entering Canada as a landed immigrant. But I constantly felt that I am an immigrant: “immigrant forever”. If I dare to forget that I am an immigrant or try to “behave” like I have lived all my life in Canada, some people quickly remind me the precarity of my status: “Oh, did you arrive recently to Canada?” with a reference to the wave of Syrian refugees that Canada received in 2016. And, honestly, I am not offended. To the contrary, I like to be an immigrant. It makes feel humble and light as if I belonged to two worlds with attachments to neither.

When I am in Tunis, the city I was born in, a Tunisian taxi driver would ask me “ Where are you from?” Something in my demeanour, the choice of my words or my behaviour, make locals realize that I don’t belong and the taxi driver is absolutely right! Yes, I speak the dialect, yes I am obviously Muslim with my headscarf, but in my heart I despise the way people behave in the streets, constantly trying to cheat you, and the lack of civility especially among the “nouveaux riches” who think that they can buy everything except good manners, of course.

In Canada, it is no way better. Despite the fact, I went to university here and speak both official languages, run for politics, write books, I am constantly reminded that I don’t belong. Through looks, comments and sometimes as subtle as embarrassing silence that tells more than words. But that doesn’t bother me as much since I am proud to call my self an immigrant.

These days, with the media hype surrounding the celebration of the Canada’s 150th birthday, I started asking myself about the position I should adopt as an immigrant and as a Muslim vis à vis those “celebrations”.

In fact, my position emanates from two angles: my sense of belonging and my faith. As, an “immigrant forever” I feel that I have an official status: a Canadian citizen and a de facto one: a guest on the land of the Indigenous communities. I constantly thrive to keep these two statuses coherent as much as possible. I don’t want the Canadian rights that were granted to me through my citizenship to trumpet, threaten, bully or diminish the right of the ancestors of this land: the Indigenous communities.

I don’t want to behave like an entitled settler and pretend that the materialistic goods that I own are solely the result of my work or my sweat. Perhaps for some of it, but there is more in them, there is the land that was built on them and the roads that our cars and buses run on. Those lands were never ceded. On these lands, residential schools were built and children from Indigenous communities were taken away from their families, stripped off their culture and languages. These “barbaric acts” created a disruption of generations. Generations where adults and youth used to be so close and attached were forcibly separated. So I don’t want to be part of this injustice.

In environment, we have been convinced to reduce our ecological footprint, so why don’t we also try to reduce our “settler footprint” too?

Some new Canadians, claim that they were not part of this original injustice so they don’t feel concerned or at least in any way complicit of it. But, how about this example: let’s imagine that someone who steals money from a friend, never get caught and later becomes super rich and builds a huge and luxurious building. In the meanwhile he has a change of heart and becomes very generous and starts offering “free apartments in his building to people”. So how can we “normalize” these free apartments and forget the fact that they were unethically built? Isn’t some sort of “thief wash”, similar to money laundering that is today financially and criminally fought by many governments around the globe?

From a Muslim perspective, the question of celebrating “Canada 150th birthday” is also very problematic. The concept of immigration or “hijra” in Islam is so important. When Prophet Mohamed was persecuted in his hometown of Mecca, he left with his companions and established a new community in “Medina”. One of the first acts the Prophet did in Medina was to create “brotherhood” and “sisterhood” bonds between the immigrants (named al Muhajirin) and the original inhabitants of Medina (named al Ansar, or the ones who supported his message). Those bonds were not only spiritual but also financial and materialistic: they shared houses, lands and businesses. Such acts are crucial today as we are hearing about “reconciliation”. How can Muslims communities in Canada, pretend not to be affected by these discussions when the origin of Canada and still today’s wealth has been built around land confiscation, colonialism and exploitation of natural ressources?

We shouldn’t only give the example of Israel and denounce its occupation of the Palestinian lands. Closer home, we have Indigenous communities who still live under occupation in reserves without access to clean water, to schools and medical services and we have to educate ourselves about their situations and denounce as much as we can the treatment reserved by Canada to its First Nations. Islam isn’t a religion of peace; it is a religion of justice. If we feel powerless to change oppressive institutions, we have at least to denounce systems that underlie them and allow injustice to operate and be perpetuated.

For all these reasons and more, I would be extremely careful in joining any celebration. Unfortunately, some of these Canada 150th birthday celebrations, become photo ops for some politicians to show how well “integrated” the Muslim immigrant communities are. In realities, those shallow ceremonies are erasing memories of colonialism to build new fake memories of belonging. We have to be vigilant and ask ourselves “ what are we celebrating here”?

 

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “What Does Canada “150th Celebrations” Mean to Me

  1. Brilliant article! Summarizes so much how I feel as a Palestinian Canadian who is proud of both identities but doesn’t quite feel she belongs 100% to either one…

  2. Naima1217

    I thoroughly enjoyed your article.
    I can relate to how you feel. As an Algerian-born who came to Canada 30 years ago in 1987, I feel more Canadian than Algerian, however I am still proud of my Algerian/Berber heritage. I cannot identify with a single culture or identity but rather multiple identities/cultures that have shaped who I am: Muslim, Canadian, Berber, Algerian, and French.
    I consider it a plus as i can communicate with various people: Arabic speaking, French-Speaking, Berber-Speaking, and English-Speaking.
    I can also relate to various cultures instead of one.
    Thank you very much for expressing what I have felt for a long time.
    Even though I am more loyal to Canada than my birth country Algeria, as I have lived here more than in my birth country, and both of my children were born here, I do feel that often I am also reminded that I am from elsewhere.
    Hopefully our children will not feel that way.
    Best Regards,
    Edmonton, Alberta

  3. Naima1217

    I am happy that you spoke about the conditions of the aboriginal people as we tend to forget about them. It is very sad that they are still living in third-world conditions hidden from mainstream society.
    As immigrants we are treated better than Aboriginals: we are allowed to keep our language, culture, and faith, but Aboriginals were stripped of their culture, language and everything that made their identity. In addition to that they suffered for generations of physical and psychological trauma. We need to make sure that when we stand for justice we do it for everyone regardless of who they are because it is the “human’ thing to do. We need to encourage our respective communities to engage with the Aboriginal community, learn from them, and support them.
    Thank you for a beautiful article and reminder.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s